Skip Navigation
Tue Sep 02, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Listing

Select a Question & Answer entry to see a list of service providers.

Army Policies/Regulations -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-10 of 36 Knowledge Entries
Page 1 of 4 Next 10 Knowledge Entries >
Go to page:  
Question / Answer

Question:
Are families of active duty service member who lost their retirement eligibility because they were court martialed and separated still eligible for TRICARE?

Answer:
Families of active-duty service members who lost their retirement eligibility because they were court-martialed and separated for abuse, and spouses and children of NATO representatives under certain circumstances are eligible for TRICARE.

Question:
Are the casualty assistance services the same for family members of service members who die OCONUS?

Answer:
The casualty assistance provided to family members of service members who die in CONUS or OCONUS is the same. The Army or other branch of service to which the service member is affiliated will assist with the transportation of remains back to the U.S., if applicable, and will assist the service member's family with their stateside relocation, in addition to the other casualty-related services.

Question:
Are there any approval requirements for Family Readiness Groups (FRGs) and/or other private organizations associated with a military community to hold a fundraising event?

Answer:
Whomever is coordinating the event should discuss the proposed fundraiser with your organization’s commander, rear detachment officer, president, or other senior leader and get approval. In most military communities, you will have to submit a request letter to an approving authority to hold the fundraising event. Typically, this letter is submitted to the Directorate of Community Activities; however, contact your local command for specific guidelines. If you plan on holding the event at a concession or public area on post, you may also need to get permission from the manager in charge of that area (e.g., Post Exchange or Commissary manager). Consult the Army Family Readiness Leader’s Handbook, as well as the other resources provided, for more information on fundraising.

Question:
Are there any confidentialy rules that apply to volunteers in Army-endorsed activities?

Answer:
Yes; volunteers in Army-endorsed activities are bound by Army rules regulating confidentiality and privileged information. However, it is appropriate to violate confidentiality to report spouse or child abuse, and certain types of threats against the government.

Question:
As a Family Readiness Group Leader (or advisor to an FRG), what Army Regulations and/or Department of Defense Regulations should I be aware of?

Answer:
There are a number of official publications and documents that you should be aware of such as: The Army Family Readiness Group Leader's Handbook that is part of the Operation READY materials, AR 608-1 (Army Community Service Center); AR 340-21 (The Army Privacy Program); AR 672-20 (Incentive Awards); DA Forms 4162R and 4713R (for documenting volunteer hours), etc. The Army FRG Leader Handbook has a wealth of information regarding FRG funds, use of official mail for distributing FRG newsletters, and other important information regarding volunteer management and leading an effective FRG. Consult the Legal Services office in your military community regarding updates and changes to regulations governing FRGs.

Question:
As a pregnant Soldier getting ready to separate from the military, am I still eligible to deliver my child in a military treatment facility?

Answer:
Expectant service members who separate from the military prior to delivery may deliver the child in a military treatment facility after separation.

Question:
Can I have a pet in my government furnished quarters?

Answer:
Pets are generally allowed in government furnished quarters although some restrictions may apply in terms of the number of pets and type of animals allowed. Check with your military community's housing office for more information. Note that in most cases, temporary lodging accommodations do not allow pets.

Question:
Can I operate my own business in my on-post quarters?

Answer:
To increase employment opportunities for military spouses, home-based businesses are permitted in military family housing. However, some restrictions apply. Individuals wishing to engage in commercial activities in government furnished quarters should submit a written request to the installation commander for authorization to do so. Commanders must consider issues such as local government licensing requirements, potential government liability, overseas Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA), host nation business practices, and prospective advertising practices before granting approvals. Additionally, commanders may not authorize commercial activities in family housing areas that jeopardize military community tranquility, harmony among neighbors, or safety.

Question:
Can my spouse fly on military aircraft when we get ready to relocate to look for a house or job?

Answer:
One dependent is authorized to fly Space Available on military aircraft when accompanying a Uniformed Services member traveling under permissive (Temporary Duty) TDY orders for house hunting incident to a pending Permanent Change of Station (PCS). Refer to DoD 4515.13-R, Air Transportation Eligibility, November 1994, for more information on Space Available Travel.

Question:
How are vacation days determined for full-time and part-time employees (military and civilian)?

Answer:
Military personnel accrue 2.5 days of annual leave (paid vacation) each month of service (or 30 days/year). Up to 60 days of unused leave from one year can be carried over to the following year. However, on the first day of the fiscal year (October 1st), any excess leave above 60 days is forfeited. There are some exceptions to these rules such as the ability to carry over more than 60 days of leave (e.g., up to 90 days) if the service member was unable to take leave due to an assignment in a hazardous duty zone. Accrual of annual leave for Department of the Army (DA) Civilian employees is computed based on total number of years of years of creditable Federal service including active duty military time: < 3 yrs of Federal service = 4 hours per pay period (13 days per year); 3 - 15 years of Federal service = 6 hours per pay period (20 days per year); 15 or more years of Federal service = 8 hours per pay period (26 days per year). Generally, a maximum of 240 hours may be carried over to the next leave year; however, exceptions exist.
Viewing 1-10 of 36 Knowledge Entries
Page 1 of 4 Next 10 Knowledge Entries >
Go to page:  

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: