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Personal Affairs -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-9 of 9 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
Can I take my Soldier's car out of a unit holding area while he/she is deployed?

Answer:
If your Soldier leaves a car in a unit holding area and deploys, he/she must have completed a release form indicating that you, by name, may take the car out of the area, and this must be filled out before your spouse deploys.

Question:
How do I obtain or renew my Military ID card?

Answer:
Most of the military benefits for service members and their dependents such as commissary and exchange privileges, access to recreation facilities, theaters, and medical care require a valid Military identification card. Service members are issued ID cards upon entry to active service. DD Form 1172 (Application for Uniformed Services Identification and Privilege Card), is used to apply for issue, or reissue of, ID cards. This form is automated and generated through the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) and the information must be verified from the sponsor’s personnel records or from the appropriate documents as applicable. These may include marriage certificates, birth certificates or adoption papers, certification of student status (for dependent children over the age of 18), or medical statements. Family members of active duty personnel use DD Form 1173, whereas family members of the DoD Guard and Reserve Component use a DD Form 1173-1. Military IDs are issued by personnel detachment service centers through the Real-Time Automated Personnel Identification System (RAPIDS). Contact your military community’s personnel office for more information or visit the RAPIDS Site locator online to find the nearest service center to you (http://www.dmdc.osd.mil/rsl).

Question:
What can I do to prepare for a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move while my spouse is deployed?

Answer:
The most obvious things you can do to prepare for a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move while your spouse is deployed is to get organized. If you have official orders for the move, you may be able to set up your transportation appointments and notify Housing (if you live in government quarters). You may need a Power of Attorney (POA) to make some arrangements. The other thing you can do is to contact your Relocation Assistance office for information about your new destination or visit the Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES), which is an online Dept. of Defense (DoD) resource that provides a wealth of information on military installations throughout the world.

Question:
What can I do to prepare my child for my spouse's deployment?

Answer:
Deployments can be very difficult on families, particularly on children. Depending on the age of a child, it is important for the child to have some understanding of what a deployment is why his/her parent must go away. It is also important for the child to maintain some form of normalcy in his/her daily routine as well as to maintain contact with his/her parent during the time the parent is deployed whether it be via the phone, Internet or mail. Some parents record audio and/or videotapes of themselves reading bedtime stories before they deploy so the young child can hear his/her parent's voice while they are separated. Your Family Readiness Group (FRG) Leader may have other suggestions, as might your military community's Deployment Readiness Coordinator. There are also many deployment resources available online to assist you with activities and advice for helping children cope before, during and after a parent's deployment.

Question:
What do I do if I've lost my military ID card and my Soldier is deployed?

Answer:
The first thing you should do if you have lost your military ID card is to contact the local military police (MP) to report the incident. In most cases, you will not be issued a replacement ID card without a memorandum from the MP stating that the incident was reported. If your Soldier is deployed, the ID Card Processing center should be able to work with you to replace your ID card without your sponsor physically being present.

Question:
What happens if my Military ID card expires while my Soldier (sponsor) is deployed?

Answer:
Without a valid military ID card you cannot get mail (from your sponsor's organization), use the hospital, Post Exchange (PX), commissary or other facilities, and may even be denied entry to the post.

Question:
What is the Army One Source Program?

Answer:
Army One Source (AOS) is a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week toll-free information and referral telephone service available to active duty, National Guard and Reserve soldiers, deployed civilians and their families worldwide. AOS provides information ranging from every day concerns to deployment/reintegration issues. Additionally, if there is a need for face-to-face counseling, AOS will provide referrals to professional civilian counselors for assistance. OCONUS, face-to-face counseling is provided via existing Medical Treatment Facility-contracted marriage and family counselors. n CONUS, call 1-800-464-8107; OCONUS, call toll-free 800-464-810777 or collect at 484-530-5889. You can also visit their website at www.armyonesource.com. For your initial login, enter "Army" for the User ID and "onesource" for the Password.

Question:
What is the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program?

Answer:
The purpose of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children - better known as the WIC Program - is to help safeguard the health of low-income women, infants, & children up to age 5 who are at nutritional risk by providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, information on healthy eating, and referrals to health care.

Question:
What type of assistance is provided by the Army Judge Advocate General's Corps?

Answer:
Army Legal Assistance providers advise Soldiers, family members, and other authorized clients on a number of legal matters such as family law (adoption, marriage, divorce), landlord/tenant issues, tax assistance, wills and estates, powers of attorney, notary services, immigration and naturalization, etc. In some cases, Legal Assistance Attorneys are allowed to represent certain military members in civil court. For more information on the Judge Advocate General's Corps, visit their website at http://www.jagcnet.army.mil.
Viewing 1-9 of 9 Knowledge Entries

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