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Army Resources -- Question & Answer Listing  
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Question / Answer

Question:
As a senior spouse, Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader, or advisor to a volunteer organization, how can my knowledge of military resources benefit the organization?

Answer:
Members, particularly of a Family Readiness Group (FRG), who have years of experience living in military communities or knowledge of military community resources have a great deal to offer the organization. Aside from the obvious advantage of being able to share information to less informed members on what resources and services are available to them, you may be able to use the knowledge and/or connections you have with leaders in the community to help your organization grow and succeed. For example, if you need locations to distribute flyers about a fundraising event your group is having, perhaps you can work with the managers of the Commissary and/or Post Exchange to make them available to their patrons. Perhaps you work with a Girl Scout troop and can help arrange for a community leader (such as someone from the Dental Clinic, Veterinary Services, Military Police, or Fire Department) to be a guest speaker at one of your meetings. You may also be able to use your knowledge of community resources to help your organization locate facilities to hold their meetings or other events. Knowing what resources are available to your organization and its members is an asset. Learn more about your military and civilian communities through the resources provided.

Question:
Can I find out about MWR facilities and resources online?

Answer:
Most (if not all) military communities have a website that includes information on the type of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) facilities and resources that are available. You can locate your specific community's website by selecting the "A-Z" option on the official Army website (www.army.mil) or go directly to your installation's MWR page by finding your installation from the MWR website at www.armymwr.com.

Question:
How important are pre-deployment briefings for families?

Answer:
Pre-deployment briefings are very important for families, even for those families who have experienced many deployments in the past. Useful information is provided to Soldiers and family members at pre-deployment briefings. Also, there usually are representatives from many of the military community agencies (legal, medical, housing, finance, chaplain, etc.) at these briefings, who are there to answer questions and provide on-the-spot services. For example, the legal representative may be able to generate Powers of Attorney or set up appointments to develop a Family Care Plan or will. The Finance representative can provide answers to questions about separation pay or other changes that the service member may see on his Leave and Earning statement (LES) once he/she is deployed. Pre-deployment briefings are also a good time for Soldiers and family members to update their emergency tracking forms and/or contact information for the Family Readiness Group (FRG) and/or Rear Detachment Commander. Pre-deployment briefings provide a forum to allow Soldiers to plan for their upcoming military duty away from home and prepare them and their families for the separation.

Question:
What are some examples of information that might be useful to compile in a welcome packet for Family Readiness Group (FRG) members?

Answer:
Information about the unit, installation and surrounding civilian communities are always good resources to include in a welcome packet for Family Readiness Group (FRG) members. Many times this information is already compiled by the installation (often Army Community Service), so check with them before duplicating efforts. It is also a good idea to include a list of Points of Contact in the unit and perhaps emergency phone numbers specific to the local military and civilian community. As an FRG leader, it is also a good idea to maintain a resource library of information about community organizations and agencies (e.g., crisis intervention and networking resources, etc.) that can be readily available in the event that one of your FRG members needs assistance.

Question:
What do I need to do in order to use the Child and Youth Services facilities on post?

Answer:
In order to use the Child and Youth Services programs in your military community, you must complete a registration process that may vary according to the type of programs you want your child to participate in. For example, to use the Child Development Services (CDS) for childcare, you will have to complete several standard registration forms that provide CDS management and care giving staff with child and family data needed for program management, health, safety, enrollment and admission requirements. The registration packet also includes several consent forms that outline the types of activities the child can participate in, any medication that may need dispensing while your child is at the CDS facility, emergency contact information, a family care plan (if applicable), and health assessment forms (including proof that your child’s immunizations are current). U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Child and Adult Care Food Program (USDA CACFP) enrollment forms is used to determine patron eligibility categories and reimbursement levels for program participation is also included. The packet will also include a Sponsor/Program Agreement that outlines and clarifies the responsibilities of the parent or guardian and the CDS program regarding provision and acceptance of CDS services. While this list is not all-inclusive, it provides a summary of the key areas that are covered in the CDS Registration Packet. Note that you will need to update your child’s registration annually and that a registration fee normally applies.

Question:
What installation resources can I use for an unofficial social function (e.g., spouses' coffee, holiday party for our FRG, etc.)?

Answer:
The resources vary from installation to installation and depend on the function and the facility's availability. However, several suggestions to consider are: the unit recreation room, conference rooms in the unit's HQ building, the Family Readiness (or Assistance) Center, chapel facilities, schools, and MWR facilities. In many cases, all you will need is permission from whomever owns or manages the facility.

Question:
What is the Army One Source Program?

Answer:
Army One Source (AOS) is a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week toll-free information and referral telephone service available to active duty, National Guard and Reserve soldiers, deployed civilians and their families worldwide. AOS provides information ranging from every day concerns to deployment/reintegration issues. Additionally, if there is a need for face-to-face counseling, AOS will provide referrals to professional civilian counselors for assistance. OCONUS, face-to-face counseling is provided via existing Medical Treatment Facility-contracted marriage and family counselors. n CONUS, call 1-800-464-8107; OCONUS, call toll-free 800-464-810777 or collect at 484-530-5889. You can also visit their website at www.armyonesource.com. For your initial login, enter "Army" for the User ID and "onesource" for the Password.

Question:
What is the Family Advocacy Program (FAP)?

Answer:
The Family Advocacy Program (FAP) provides spouse and child abuse prevention, reporting, investigation, protection, and treatment to all authorized family members affected by the abuse. Visit the Army Community Service (ACS) on your local military community for more information on this program.

Question:
Where can I find installation-specific information?

Answer:
If you are relocating to a new military community or just anticipating a move, you can find installation-specific information by contacting your local Army Community Service (ACS) center and visit their Relocation Readiness office. Additionally, you can visit the Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES), which is an online Dept. of Defense (DoD) resource that provides a wealth of information on military installations throughout the world. You can also visit the specific installation's website. If you don't know where to find it, check with the official Army website at http://www.army.mil/a-z.htm. More specific housing-related information can be found at the Army Housing OneStop website (http://www.onestoparmy.com).

Question:
Who manages the support agencies on Army installations?

Answer:
The mission of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency (IMA) is to provide equitable, effective and efficient management of Army installations worldwide to support mission readiness and execution, enable the well-being of Soldiers, civilians and family members, improve infrastructure, and preserve the environment. IMA is responsible for the day-to-day “city management” of installations, such as housing, support services and programs, and all the various business operations found on an installation. For more information on IMA, visit their website at http://www.ima.army.mil/index.asp.
Viewing 1-10 of 10 Knowledge Entries

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