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Army Information -- Question & Answer Listing  
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Question / Answer

Question:
What are some of the skills needed to produce a Family Readiness Group (FRG) newsletter?

Answer:
Chapter 6 of the Army Family Readiness Group Leader’s Handbook (Running an Effective FRG – Communications) covers a lot of the basic information you need to generate a newsletter for your FRG. An FRG newsletter does not have to be very elaborate – it could be a small, very simple publication that contains basic information about FRG events and activities. Ideally, however, it is useful for the newsletter chairperson to have some basic writing skills such as: how to research material; use a Word Processing or Publishing software program on the computer: how to format the material to make the newsletter visually appealing; and how to reproduce and distribute the newsletter. It is also important for the individual to be organized and dependable in order to meet deadlines for the newsletter.

Question:
What are the main reasons why organizations use newsletters?

Answer:
Newsletters are used to notify members about upcoming meetings, classes, events and other activities. They are used to share information that may be of interest to group members and also to recognize the group’s or individual group members’ achievements. Newsletters can save meeting time and allow you to disseminate information to individuals who perhaps are unable to attend your regular meetings because of conflicting schedules or their geographic locations. Additionally, newsletters can also be used to share new ideas and to promote the benefits of the group to encourage more participation in their activities. Note that these are just a few of the more general reasons organizations use newsletters. The main purpose of newsletters is dependent on the goals of the organization.

Question:
What are the requirements for approving, printing and mailing a Family Readiness Group (FRG) newsletter?

Answer:
Family Readiness Groups (FRGs) can publish an official newsletter using government printing and mailing resources. There are restrictions on the content included in an official newsletter. According to the Operation READY’s Army Family Readiness Group Leader's Handbook, an official newsletter is limited to eight pages (printed on both sides). It can be produced and paid for with government funds, and must have the commander’s statement and signature. It can include: notices from the FRG leader and/or unit commander; information on community, local schools, or FRG events and meetings; news of past FRG events and activities; unit history, chain of command and training schedule; information highlighting military community agencies and phone numbers; government websites; recipes; routine information such as birth announcements or new Soldiers and families; literary pieces with a copyright release; and historical information. It cannot contain advertising for private or commercial businesses; financial reports; political notices; casualty or injury reports; copyrighted information without permission of the author, or professional sports scores. FRGs can publish other newsletters that are not restricted in content, but the must be produced and paid for with FRG or personal funds and be reviewed by the commander. Refer to the Army FRG Leader’s Guide noted above for more information on FRG newsletters, as well as AR 360-81 (Command Information Program), the Official Mail Manual DoD 4525.8M, and local military policies on FRG newsletter publishing.

Question:
What are the rules for flying space available on Air Mobility Command (AMC) flights to overseas locations?

Answer:
Space Available travel on Air Mobility Command (AMC) flights offers relatively free air travel (small fees may apply to cover airport, customs and immigration fees) for authorized personnel (e.g., service members and their dependent family members, retirees, etc.). There are a number of policies and procedures that apply to Space A travel such as the category assignments for perspective travelers that prioritizes the waiting list. For example, an active duty Soldier traveling on emergency leave would have priority over a retired Soldier traveling for leisure. Contact an AMC customer service representative for specific details on space available travel.

Question:
What can I do to prepare for a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move while my spouse is deployed?

Answer:
The most obvious things you can do to prepare for a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move while your spouse is deployed is to get organized. If you have official orders for the move, you may be able to set up your transportation appointments and notify Housing (if you live in government quarters). You may need a Power of Attorney (POA) to make some arrangements. The other thing you can do is to contact your Relocation Assistance office for information about your new destination or visit the Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES), which is an online Dept. of Defense (DoD) resource that provides a wealth of information on military installations throughout the world.

Question:
What do I do if I've lost my military ID card and my Soldier is deployed?

Answer:
The first thing you should do if you have lost your military ID card is to contact the local military police (MP) to report the incident. In most cases, you will not be issued a replacement ID card without a memorandum from the MP stating that the incident was reported. If your Soldier is deployed, the ID Card Processing center should be able to work with you to replace your ID card without your sponsor physically being present.

Question:
What is a DD Form 214 used for and where can I obtain one?

Answer:
The DD Form 214 is the Certificate of Release or Discharge From Active Duty. This form enables you to participate in VA, state and federal programs. It is recommended that, because of its importance, you keep the original in a safe, fireproof location and get certified copies made that you can use to apply for benefits and jobs.

Question:
What is a Restricted Access Personal Identification Number (RAPIN) with respect to my Leave and Earnings Statement (LES)?

Answer:
You can create a Restricted Access Personal Identification Number (RAPIN) after signing into myPay on the (DFAS) website at http://www.dfas.mil to allow your spouse or family member to have view-only access to your Leave and Earnings Statement (LES). With the RAPIN, the spouse or family member can view and print the LES and W2 but cannot make pay changes.

Question:
What is Military Time?

Answer:
Military time is based on a 24-hour clock, beginning at midnight with hours numbered from 0000 to 2300 hours. So, 1:00 AM is 0100 hours, 2:00 AM is 0200 hours, and so on up until 11:00 PM which is 2300 hours. Minutes and seconds do not change. For example, 20 minutes past 3:00 PM would be 1520 hours in military time.

Question:
What is the Armed Forces Network (AFN)?

Answer:
The American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) provides stateside radio and television programming to U.S. service men and women, DoD civilians, and their families serving outside the continental United States. The Armed Forces Network (AFN) is the worldwide radio and television broadcast network that provides this service.
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