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Army Communications -- Question & Answer Listing  
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Question / Answer

Question:
What are the requirements for approving, printing and mailing a Family Readiness Group (FRG) newsletter?

Answer:
Family Readiness Groups (FRGs) can publish an official newsletter using government printing and mailing resources. There are restrictions on the content included in an official newsletter. According to the Operation READY’s Army Family Readiness Group Leader's Handbook, an official newsletter is limited to eight pages (printed on both sides). It can be produced and paid for with government funds, and must have the commander’s statement and signature. It can include: notices from the FRG leader and/or unit commander; information on community, local schools, or FRG events and meetings; news of past FRG events and activities; unit history, chain of command and training schedule; information highlighting military community agencies and phone numbers; government websites; recipes; routine information such as birth announcements or new Soldiers and families; literary pieces with a copyright release; and historical information. It cannot contain advertising for private or commercial businesses; financial reports; political notices; casualty or injury reports; copyrighted information without permission of the author, or professional sports scores. FRGs can publish other newsletters that are not restricted in content, but the must be produced and paid for with FRG or personal funds and be reviewed by the commander. Refer to the Army FRG Leader’s Guide noted above for more information on FRG newsletters, as well as AR 360-81 (Command Information Program), the Official Mail Manual DoD 4525.8M, and local military policies on FRG newsletter publishing.

Question:
What emergency contact numbers should I be aware of?

Answer:
The most obvious emergency contact numbers to have readily available are the local police, fire, ambulance, and perhaps the local hospital emergency room numbers. These numbers are accessible in most community phone books. Your local Army Community Service (ACS) can also provide them for you. In CONUS, "911" is the number to call for true emergencies. Find out what the equivalent emergency number is (if any) if you live overseas. Several other numbers that may be helpful to have on hand in the event of an emergency are: your Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader or an FRG contact, your Soldier's unit number (or Rear Detachment Commander’s number, if your Soldier is deployed), the number(s) for a close friend or relative - which could be very useful in the event that you become incapacitated and someone else needs to contact a friend or family member on your behalf.

Question:
What is Global Internet Mail (GI Mail)?

Answer:
Global Internet Mail, or GI Mail, is a secure means for service members and their families to communicate with each other through e-mail.

Question:
What is the Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS)?

Answer:
Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS) is a Department of Defense sponsored program that consists of licensed amateur radio operators who are interested in military communications on a local, national, and international basis as an alternative to normal communications. For more information on MARS, visit their webpage at http://www.netcom.army.mil/mars/default.htm.

Question:
What security measures should I take to protect myself while my spouse is deployed?

Answer:
Safeguarding yourself and your home should be something you do regularly, whether your spouse is deployed or not. However, there are several things you can do to protect yourself when your spouse is deployed such as letting your neighbors know you are alone so they can be aware of anything out of the ordinary at your home and by being more observant of your surroundings. If you go out of town during the deployment, make sure you stop/suspend any newspaper and mail delivery or have a neighbor collect these items so they do not accumulate and "advertise" that no one is home. If you live in government quarters, it is wise to let your local military police (MP) know that you will be out of town. They will often drive by and check on your house while you are away. For more security tips, check with your military police or local law enforcement officials.

Question:
Who do I contact for on-post housing emergencies?

Answer:
Your military community housing office should have an emergency number for you to call after normal business hours for emergencies. Check your military community phone book or call the Post Operator, if necessary, to obtain this number.
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