Skip Navigation
Sat Sep 20, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Listing

Select a Question & Answer entry to see a list of service providers.

Army Installations/Units -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
Are there any special rules to follow when driving past marching or running Soldiers on a military installation?

Answer:
Speed limits are reduced (typically to 10 mph) on an installation when driving past marching or running Soldiers in formation.

Question:
How do I find out about available on-post housing when relocating to a new military community?

Answer:
When moving to a new military community, you are expected to check with the community's housing office upon your arrival to see if on-post housing is authorized and available. If there is a waiting list for on-post housing they can advise you on where to look for temporary lodging or permanent lodging if the waiting list is long. You can also visit the Army Housing OneStop website which can also provide some answers to your housing questions and concerns (http://www.onestoparmy.com)

Question:
How is the Army organized?

Answer:
The Army consists of the Active component, the U.S. Army Reserve Component, the National Guard, and Dept. of the Army Civilians. The Army is organized by a hierarchy of units with each one containing subordinate elements from combat arms, combat support, and combat service units. The smallest group of Soldiers organized to maneuver and fire is called a squad that typically consists of 9 to 10 Soldiers. Several squads make up a platoon, which is typically let by a lieutenant with a non-commissioned officer (NCO) as second in charge. Three to five platoons form a company, troop (cavalry unit), or battery (artillery unit) and is commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander’s chief NCO. There are typically four to six company level units in a battalion or squadron (for an armored or air cavalry unit of equal size), which is normally commanded by a lieutenant colonel (LTC) and command sergeant major (CSM) as his chief NCO assistant. Two to five battalion size units make up a brigade, regiment (armored cavalry), or group (ranger and special forces units) and is commanded by a colonel (COL) with a command sergeant major (CSM) as his chief NCO assistant. Several brigade-sized (typically 3) elements make up a division that is commanded by a major general (MG). Divisions consist of two to five divisions form a corps, which is typically commanded by a lieutenant general (LTG). The largest operational groups in the Army are called armies (the Theater Army, Field Army and Army Group). There are also major commands that are formed by these elements of the Army such as U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR) – headquartered in Germany and U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command – headquartered in Virginia. For more information on how the Army is organized, visit the Army’s official website at http://www.army.mil.

Question:
Where can I find installation-specific information?

Answer:
If you are relocating to a new military community or just anticipating a move, you can find installation-specific information by contacting your local Army Community Service (ACS) center and visit their Relocation Readiness office. Additionally, you can visit the Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES), which is an online Dept. of Defense (DoD) resource that provides a wealth of information on military installations throughout the world. You can also visit the specific installation's website. If you don't know where to find it, check with the official Army website at http://www.army.mil/a-z.htm. More specific housing-related information can be found at the Army Housing OneStop website (http://www.onestoparmy.com).

Question:
Who manages the support agencies on Army installations?

Answer:
The mission of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency (IMA) is to provide equitable, effective and efficient management of Army installations worldwide to support mission readiness and execution, enable the well-being of Soldiers, civilians and family members, improve infrastructure, and preserve the environment. IMA is responsible for the day-to-day “city management” of installations, such as housing, support services and programs, and all the various business operations found on an installation. For more information on IMA, visit their website at http://www.ima.army.mil/index.asp.
Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: