Skip Navigation
Mon Sep 01, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Listing

Select a Question & Answer entry to see a list of service providers.

Legal Issues -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-7 of 7 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
How can I obtain military privileges (ID cards, access to services, etc.) for my legally dependent parents, adopted children, foster children, etc.?

Answer:
In general, you must have the appropriate legal documents to certify dependency such as adoption papers for children, or other documents stating that you have legal guardianship of your parents, foster children, etc. The Army Legal assistance office can provide you with specific information on this subject.

Question:
How do I go about collecting the child support my ex-spouse was ordered by the court to pay?

Answer:
In order to collect child support that your ex-spouse/absent parent was ordered by court to provide, you should contact either an attorney or your local child support enforcement agency to learn more about your options. You might be able to get a court- or administratively-ordered deduction of a specified amount from your ex-spouse's income for payment of child support.

Question:
How do I obtain a visa for my foreign born spouse and/or adopted child?

Answer:
Contact the nearest U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) field office or the U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad for assistance on obtaining a visa for your foreign born spouse and/or adopted child.

Question:
How do I obtain or renew my stateside driver's license when serving OCONUS?

Answer:
It is best to renew your stateside driver's license before relocating overseas if it is due to expire during the time you are expected to be overseas. However, some states allow for you to renew driver's license by mail if a new photo is not required. Consult with the Department of Motor Vehicles division for the state in which your driver's license was issued.

Question:
If I am relocating do I need to update my will?

Answer:
Whenever you have a Permanent Change of Station (PCS) move or have substantial changes in your family (e.g., get married, have a child, etc.) it is important to review your will to ensure that it still represents your wishes upon your demise. Additionally, it is important to make sure your will be upheld in the new location to which you are relocating.

Question:
What kind of Powers of Attorney (POA) are available?

Answer:
"There are three basic types of Powers of Attorney (POAs): Nondurable, Durable, and a Springing Power of Attorney, each of which can be drawn up to give an Agent very broad, or very limited (specific) legal authority. A Nondurable POA is often used for a specific transaction, such as the sale of the Principal’s Privately Owned Vehicle (POV), the closing on the sale of residence, or other type of financial matter on behalf of the Principal while he/she is traveling outside of the country. A Nondurable POA takes effect immediately and remains in effect until it is revoked by the Principal, or until the Principal becomes mentally incompetent or dies. A Durable POA authorizes the Agent to act for the Principal even after the Principal is not mentally competent or physically able to make decisions. It may be used immediately, and is effective until it is revoked by the Principal, or until the Principal's death. A Springing POA becomes effective at a future time, based on the happenings of a specific event chosen by the Power of Attorney, such as the illness or disability of the Principal. This type of POA remains in effect until the Principal's death, or until revoked by a court. "

Question:
Who do I contact for juvenile delinquency prevention and control?

Answer:
Each state in the U.S. has an Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention that works with local agencies and schools to coordinate programs, policies and studies to prevent and control juvenile delinquency such as student courts, mentoring programs and juvenile boot camps. Your local schools, libraries, and law enforcement agencies should be able to provide some information or check your local phone book or the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) website for links to programs in your area (http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/index.html).
Viewing 1-7 of 7 Knowledge Entries

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: