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Army Family Programs -- Question & Answer Listing  
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Question / Answer

Question:
How much communication should I (as the Family Readiness Group Leader) have with the unit commander?

Answer:
Family Readiness Group (FRG) leaders should work very closely with the unit commander. Try to schedule regular meetings with the commander to discuss how the FRG is functioning, how to improve it, etc. Ultimately, the FRG is his/her responsibility, so the commander needs to be kept up-to-date on how it is doing. Furthermore, he/she may be able to assist you with any problems you are having or help you get additional resources or support from the unit or community. The FRG leader and the unit commander should work together to make the FRG operate effectively.

Question:
Must Army volunteers follow the same rules and regulations that paid personnel in the organization follow?

Answer:
Army volunteers are considered employees of the US Government and subject to the same ethical standards in performance as paid employees. For example, they are expected to adhere to the Privacy Act regarding confidentiality of personal information and records. If volunteers have agreed to work certain days or hours for an agency, they are expected to fulfill those obligations or contact a pre-determined member of the organization if unable to do so. Furthermore, just as employees are protected from certain liability abuses in an organization, the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 extends this protection to volunteers serving nonprofit organizations and governmental entities.

Question:
What are Family Program Academies?

Answer:
Family Program Academies are an education and training event for Guard & Reserve family members.

Question:
What are some examples of information that might be useful to compile in a welcome packet for Family Readiness Group (FRG) members?

Answer:
Information about the unit, installation and surrounding civilian communities are always good resources to include in a welcome packet for Family Readiness Group (FRG) members. Many times this information is already compiled by the installation (often Army Community Service), so check with them before duplicating efforts. It is also a good idea to include a list of Points of Contact in the unit and perhaps emergency phone numbers specific to the local military and civilian community. As an FRG leader, it is also a good idea to maintain a resource library of information about community organizations and agencies (e.g., crisis intervention and networking resources, etc.) that can be readily available in the event that one of your FRG members needs assistance.

Question:
What are some of the different positions one might find in a Family Readiness Group (FRG)?

Answer:
There are a number of different volunteer positions you may find in a Family Readiness Group (FRG), but each FRG is unique. Each unit should design their FRG to meet their own needs and the interests of its members. The following is a list of positions suggested in the Army Family Readiness Group Leader’s Handbook. Detailed descriptions of these positions are included in the FRG Leader's Handbook: ·Battalion FRG Advisor—is a member of the FRG steering committee (may chair it); provides overall guidance and support for unit-level FRGs. ·Unit FRG Leader—provides overall leadership of the FRG; interacts with the unit commander and battalion FRG steering committee. ·FRG Secretary—maintains accurate minutes of meetings and distributes information and correspondence to the FRG leader and newsletter editor. ·FRG Treasurer—along with an alternate, serves as custodian for the FRG informal fund. ·Phonetree Committee Chairperson—organizes the unit phonetree; identifies and supervises phonetree points of contact. ·Phonetree Point of Contact (POC)—maintains regular contact with assigned families; passes along official information, and provides information to families. ·Battalion (or Unit) FRG Newsletter Editor—coordinates newsletter preparation, publishing, and distribution. ·Special Events Committee Chairperson—plans, organizes, and executes FRG activities and special events. ·Hospitality/Welcome Committee Chairperson—contacts and welcomes all new soldiers and families to the unit; helps them find needed resources. ·Publicity Committee Chairperson—informs all soldiers and family members in the FRG of all activities (ongoing and upcoming). ·Fundraiser Committee Chairperson—manages all FRG fundraising activities, including coordination, permission, and recruiting. ·Childcare Committee Chairperson—ensures acceptable childcare for FRG meetings and special events.

Question:
What are some of the skills needed to produce a Family Readiness Group (FRG) newsletter?

Answer:
Chapter 6 of the Army Family Readiness Group Leader’s Handbook (Running an Effective FRG – Communications) covers a lot of the basic information you need to generate a newsletter for your FRG. An FRG newsletter does not have to be very elaborate – it could be a small, very simple publication that contains basic information about FRG events and activities. Ideally, however, it is useful for the newsletter chairperson to have some basic writing skills such as: how to research material; use a Word Processing or Publishing software program on the computer: how to format the material to make the newsletter visually appealing; and how to reproduce and distribute the newsletter. It is also important for the individual to be organized and dependable in order to meet deadlines for the newsletter.

Question:
What are some signs and/or indicators of spouse/child abuse?

Answer:
Spouse or child abuse can be physical, sexual, or emotional. Physical neglect of a child is also a form of abuse. The most obvious symptoms of abuse are physical ones such as severe bruises, scratches, burns, broken bones and/or internal injuries that could have resulted from being hit, thrown or beaten and often times the reluctance or vagueness about where these injuries originated. Symptoms that a child may have been sexually abused may be precocious behavior, sexual knowledge or behavior that is beyond normal for their age, chaffing around the genitals or other physical signs that may indicate inappropriate touching or behavior has taken place. Emotional abuse is harder to identify, but abused children (or adults) often act withdrawn, quiet and have a lack of self-esteem. Symptoms of physical neglect can be poor physical hygiene to include dirty hair, unwashed clothes or soiled diapers and/or other physical features that are symptomatic of poor nutrition. Note that this list of symptoms is not conclusive. However, if you suspect someone is a victim of spouse abuse, urge the individual to seek professional help. There are a number of agencies that can assist victims of domestic violence, offering confidential counseling, financial, and medical assistance. Contact your local child protective services agency, police, hospital, or emergency hotline if you suspect a child is being abused.

Question:
What are the basic roles and functions of a Family Readiness Group (FRG)?

Answer:
A Family Readiness Group (FRG) is an organization of family members, volunteers, and Soldiers belonging to a unit, that together provide an avenue of mutual support and assistance, and a network of communications among the family members, the chain of command, and community resources. Members should feel welcomed and the activities held should be varied to support the interests and needs of all members.

Question:
What are the eligibility requirements for Army Emergency Relief (AER) services during deployment/activation?

Answer:
Members of the Reserve Components (Army National Guard Reserve and U.S. Army Reserve) and their dependents are eligible for Army Emergency Relief (AER) services once they have been on continuous active duty for mre than 30 days. This applies to Soldiers on active duty for training (ADT) or serving under various sections of title 10, United States Code.

Question:
What are the eligibility requirements for WIC (Women, Infants and Children) and where do I apply for WIC benefits?

Answer:
Applicants must meet all of the four eligibility requirements: Categorical (pregnant, postpartum, or breastfeeding women, infants, or children up to age 5); Residential (must live in the State in which they apply); Income Requirement (must have an income at or below an income level standard set by the State agency); and the Nutrition Risk Requirement (must be seen by a health professional who must determine whether the individual is at nutrition risk). Contact your State or local agency to set up an appointment to apply for WIC benefits.
Viewing 11-20 of 65 Knowledge Entries
< Previous 10 Knowledge Entries Page 2 of 7 Next 10 Knowledge Entries >
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