Skip Navigation
Thu Oct 23, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Listing

Select a Question & Answer entry to see a list of service providers.

Conflict or Crisis Management -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-10 of 16 Knowledge Entries
Page 1 of 2 Next 6 Knowledge Entries >
Go to page:  
Question / Answer

Question:
Are the casualty assistance services the same for family members of service members who die OCONUS?

Answer:
The casualty assistance provided to family members of service members who die in CONUS or OCONUS is the same. The Army or other branch of service to which the service member is affiliated will assist with the transportation of remains back to the U.S., if applicable, and will assist the service member's family with their stateside relocation, in addition to the other casualty-related services.

Question:
Having a Family Readiness Group (FRG) plan for dealing with trauma in the unit may be a smart thing to do, but wouldn’t it stir up unnecessary anxieties?

Answer:
No one wants to face the fact that a unit could experience injuries or casualties during a deployment, but being prepared for such a crisis is very important. A crisis is tragic enough, but when chaos follows, the situation is worsened. It is important to develop a plan for dealing with trauma in the organization so that Family Readiness Group (FRG) members know what to do to support each other and those affected by the tragedy better. The way to approach any kind of trauma in the unit training is to promote it as preparing the FRG for the worst-case scenario. The same training can help the FRG deal with other crises – such as the death of a family member outside the unit or perhaps an injury or illness affecting a Soldier’s family in the unit. The basis for a plan includes things like having a list of volunteers who might be willing to prepare meals for the affected family or who may be able to provide child care on short notice. Perhaps you have members who might be willing to provide transportation to and from the airport for visiting relatives. It is also a good idea to know what community resources are available to you (e.g., chaplain, Army Emergency Relief, American Red Cross, etc.). Families should be aware of the casualty notification process and have an idea of what happens to the Soldier and family following notification. There are official procedures in place for handling a casualty in the unit that involve the chain of command, the chaplain, and the Casualty Assistance Office. Although the commander may ask for the FRG leader to coordinate a meeting to inform the other spouses of the tragedy, the FRG’s support would be in the form of assistance to each other. Gestures and assistance to the grieving family as noted above may be provided, but should only be done with the grieving family’s consent and at their request. It is also important for families to know whom to contact (and who their extended families should contact) in the event of an emergency in order for the deployed Soldier to be notified. The American Red Cross provides emergency communication services to notify military personnel of a death or serious illness of a family member or other important events such as the birth of a child. In order to facilitate the notification, you should have complete identification information for your Soldier prior to contacting the Red Cross such as his/her full name, rank/rating, branch of service, social security number, unit address, and any other information about the deployed unit (e.g., attached to another organization). Your rear detachment commander can provide assistance.

Question:
How can I prevent a small problem from becoming a major problem?

Answer:
One way to prevent small problems from becoming major problems is to recognize signs that problems are emerging and take decisive action on them so they do not get any worse. Remain alert for signs of trouble and train the members of your group or organization to look for them as well. Another way to prevent small problems from spiraling out of control is to have contingency plans in place that will enable you to respond more quickly and effectively to problematic situations. Note that these are just a couple general suggestions. Depending on the type of business or problem, other procedures may be more effective. Check with some of the listed references for more information on this subject.

Question:
How can our volunteer organization's advisor assist when there's group conflict?

Answer:
One of the advisor's roles is to serve as a mediator in times of organizational crises. Your advisor should remain objective when dealing with emotional or divisive group issues, but he/she can provide guidance from his/her own experiences or provide direction in terms of outside resources that can assist. Additionally, it is important for the advisor to be knowledgeable about any laws, regulations, and ethical considerations that may apply to the situation. The advisor can provide suggestions to help the group resolve their problems, but should do so without influencing the group's decision.

Question:
How important is it for organizations to embrace change?

Answer:
All organizations must change in order to grow. However, these changes should support the organization's mission and strategic vision. Change without strategic vision may bring about controversy among its members. Furthermore, change should not be implemented simply for the “sake of change." For example, technological advances often provide opportunities to make an organization's operations more efficient and effective. However, leaders often adopt different methods of operations because they are new and popular, yet they do not support the strategic vision of the organization and may not be cost effective to implement. Analyze the benefits of change in an organization and develop a vision that encourages group members to seek challenges and opportunities to allow the organization to grow.

Question:
How should I deal with individuals in my organization who exhibit passive-aggressive behaviors?

Answer:
Passive-aggressive individuals tend to mask their internal aggressive emotions by indirectly expressing it in subtle, nonverbal ways to others. For example, these individuals are often resentful of authority figures (parents, teachers, employers, etc.) and may be bitter about others’ successes or positions. They may appear to be team players by agreeing to take on a task, but often sabotage it by purposely performing substandard work, or suddenly becoming sick or unavailable in order to avoid doing the task promised. Other behaviors associated with passive-aggressive people include having a negative attitude all the time, subtly criticizing authority figures, or purposely “forgetting” to do something. It is important to identify people in your organization who display this type of behavior so you can properly manage it and avoid group conflict. Individuals often display passive-aggressive behavior to get attention. As a leader, if you recognize this, you may want to find ways to give this person some attention to gain his/her cooperation. Find something the individuals are good at and ask them to take the lead on a project that would allow them to use their talents. However, check with the individual periodically (or work with him/her) to make sure the project is on schedule. Recognize the fact that this individual may be trying to manipulate you. It is not your responsibility to change his/her ways, but to work with different personality types and group behaviors as best you can in order for your organization to be cohesive and meet your goals. Check with some of the references listed here for more information on how to deal with varied and often disruptive behaviors in a group setting.

Question:
Is conflict always bad?

Answer:
Conflict is not always bad. In fact, conflict can stimulate ideas, interest, curiosity, and promote personal growth and change. Conflict can stir up issue that may result in improvements to existing situations. Furthermore, the efforts to resolve conflict in the workplace can often increase group cohesiveness and performance.

Question:
What are some basic steps of crisis intervention that Family Readiness Group (FRG) leaders, for example, should be aware of?

Answer:
Family Readiness Group (FRG) Leaders may be one of the first persons contacted by members of their FRG when a problem or crisis occurs. Listen to the individual's account of the problem or crisis and write down essential information such as: the name and contact information of the FRG member, details given about the problem, determine who else (if any) has been contacted, determine who should handle the problem, record any actions taken by the individual or yourself, and determine any need to follow up. Be aware of local emergency numbers for medical, fire, and police assistance, as well as national hotlines for suicide prevention, domestic violence, poison control, etc. Keep these and other local community and military resource information on-hand. Note the importance of keeping information confidential. However, if you suspect the individual is in a life-threatening or abusive situation, it is your responsibility to intervene. For more information on crisis intervention refer to the references listed here.

Question:
What are some conflict management strategies?

Answer:
Most resources identify five basic conflict management strategies:·Competing – using assertive (or forceful) behavior to impose one’s own concerns or opinions on others without regard to others; ·Avoiding – not dealing with the conflict that exists nor taking any action to resolve it; ·Collaborating – working with the conflicting parties to arrive at a resolution that is satisfactory to all parties concerned; ·Accommodating – neglecting one’s own concerns to satisfy the concerns of others; and ·Compromising – working out an agreement that is partially satisfying to all conflicting parties. Most people tend to have a preferred conflict management style, but it is important to recognize other methods and use alternative strategies accordingly. For example, while a leader may tend to be more collaborating in his/her conflict management style, a conflict may arise that requires a quick resolution. In this instance, he/she may need to use a more forceful (competing) style of conflict management to take care of the issue. Learn more about conflict management from the resources listed.

Question:
What are some factors that have an affect on group decision making?

Answer:
No matter what method of group decision-making is used, it is important to understand the affects that certain factors can have on the process. For example, group members have different personalities. As a leader, it is important to recognize these different personalities and make sure you allow the diversity to support the process - not cause undue friction among group members. People often have hidden agendas such that they may try to sway the group one way or another in order to benefit their cause as opposed to making the best decision for the group. Other factors that could affect group decision-making are external loyalties, political affiliations, and social or religious reasons. Learn more about group decision-making through some of the references cited here.
Viewing 1-10 of 16 Knowledge Entries
Page 1 of 2 Next 6 Knowledge Entries >
Go to page:  

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: