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Ethics and Ethical Reasoning -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-6 of 6 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
How do social influences affect one’s personal values?

Answer:
Personal values refer to the principles that define you as an individual such as honesty, reliability, and trust, determine how you interact with people. A person’s values are developed over time and are influenced by the values taught and shown by their parents, educators, clergymen, friends, and other members of society. Social influences can affect one’s personal values if the individual feels pressured by others (whether real or imaginative) to change his/her behavior, values, beliefs, attitudes and perceptions. An individual’s values may be altered if he/she feels compelled to change to match the responses or actions of others in order to gain social approval or to maintain a certain self-image. Learn more about personal values through the references listed.

Question:
How does one's rank or a member's spouse's rank impact the Family Readiness Group?

Answer:
The opinions, experiences and attitudes expressed based on a member’s position (e.g., Commander, 1st Sergeant, Commander's Spouse, Command Sergeant Major's, 1st Sergeant's Spouse, etc.) may influence group perception and the Family Readiness Group’s ability to function successfully. There are times when military leaders in the FRG are expected to demonstrate their leadership within the FRG (e.g., in terms of providing unit information or guidance). However, rank should not play a part in the FRG. Members should express opinions and attitudes in a manner that does not limit others' participation by exerting undue influence through their position or that of their spouse.

Question:
How important is it for a leader to embrace the organization's values?

Answer:
There are many answers to this question, but the important point here is that strategic leaders (any leader, actually) should develop a method to measure his/her success. Strategic leaders are the individuals in an organization who have long-term vision and who have a key role in developing the organization's goals. Their success is typically associated with how well the organization does in reaching these goals. The tools used to measure the organization's progress in achieving these goals can also be used to measure the strategic leader's success. Other ways to measure a leader's success include surveying the members in the organization on the "corporate climate" in which they work. It is also dependent on how well he/she manages the organization's resources (money, time, people, etc.) and how well he/she does in keeping the group focused on pursuing the organization’s goals when external pressures distract them. Learn more about effective leadership and organizational management using some of the references listed here.

Question:
In what ways might a leader’s personal values negatively affect a situation?

Answer:
Although everyone has a right to his/her own opinion and set of personal values, it is important to recognize that they can produce adverse reactions in different situations if they severely conflict with others’ in the organization. It is important for a leader to adapt his/her behavior (without compromising his/her integrity) so it reflects the appropriate response rather than imposing value-based judgment.

Question:
Must Army volunteers follow the same rules and regulations that paid personnel in the organization follow?

Answer:
Army volunteers are considered employees of the US Government and subject to the same ethical standards in performance as paid employees. For example, they are expected to adhere to the Privacy Act regarding confidentiality of personal information and records. If volunteers have agreed to work certain days or hours for an agency, they are expected to fulfill those obligations or contact a pre-determined member of the organization if unable to do so. Furthermore, just as employees are protected from certain liability abuses in an organization, the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 extends this protection to volunteers serving nonprofit organizations and governmental entities.

Question:
Why is it important for a command team (e.g., battalion commander and his/her spouse, command sergeant major and his/her spouse, etc.) to develop a personal philosophy for command and leadership?

Answer:
One of the activities included in the Command Team Seminar, offered to incoming battalion and brigade level commanders, command sergeant majors and their spouses, is to develop a personal philosophy for the command team. This philosophy should include the couple’s personal goals and values, as well as some of the expectations they have of one another and of their future assignment. Battalion and brigade level commands can be very stressful, but are often thought of as highpoints in a professional Soldier’s career. It is easy for the Soldier to become consumed with his/her new position. Developing a command team philosophy helps the couple outline a plan for having balance in their life. It is important for both individuals to maintain a balance of family life and work. It is also a time for the spouse to express his/her desires in terms of unit involvement and determine his/her philosophy for the role of an informal leader within the unit. Although this is an exercise done at the pre-command course for future battalion and brigade level commanders and command sergeant majors, it is something any leader can do with his/her spouse. Maintaining a balance in one’s personal and professional life is important to both the individual’s welfare and the organization.
Viewing 1-6 of 6 Knowledge Entries

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