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Organizational Relationships -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-10 of 10 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
Are there special rules about working with local merchants and others to sponsor welcome home events for unit personnel returning from a deployment?

Answer:
Local merchants can be very generous and supportive of their military neighbors, but you should check with your local military community leaders about any laws and regulations that apply. For example, there are restrictions in place regarding gifts and fundraising practices that all Family Readiness Group (FRG) members need to be aware of.

Question:
As a leader of (or advisor to) a volunteer organization, what information should I know about monetary resource issues?

Answer:
As a leader of (or advisor to) a volunteer organization, it is important for you to know everything you can about your organization’s budget. How much money do you need to maintain your programs and services? Are you provided with sufficient funds or do you need to seek donations? Most volunteer and/or nonprofit organizations have specific operating procedures that they must follow, specifically regarding financial matters. Learn the laws, regulations, and other legal restrictions that apply to your agency. Recognize that other organizations may be competing for funds in your military and/or civilian community. Seek information on the fiscal policies and resource decisions that govern and/or impact your organization and learn what you need to do to be competitive for those resources.

Question:
As a senior spouse, Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader, or advisor to a volunteer organization, how can my knowledge of military resources benefit the organization?

Answer:
Members, particularly of a Family Readiness Group (FRG), who have years of experience living in military communities or knowledge of military community resources have a great deal to offer the organization. Aside from the obvious advantage of being able to share information to less informed members on what resources and services are available to them, you may be able to use the knowledge and/or connections you have with leaders in the community to help your organization grow and succeed. For example, if you need locations to distribute flyers about a fundraising event your group is having, perhaps you can work with the managers of the Commissary and/or Post Exchange to make them available to their patrons. Perhaps you work with a Girl Scout troop and can help arrange for a community leader (such as someone from the Dental Clinic, Veterinary Services, Military Police, or Fire Department) to be a guest speaker at one of your meetings. You may also be able to use your knowledge of community resources to help your organization locate facilities to hold their meetings or other events. Knowing what resources are available to your organization and its members is an asset. Learn more about your military and civilian communities through the resources provided.

Question:
As the Family Readiness Group (FRG) Leader or senior spouse advisor in an organization, why is it so important to understand the unit role, mission, and its organizational structure?

Answer:
As the Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader or senior spouse advisor to an organization it is important to understand the unit role, mission, and its organizational structure because this information allows you to provide information, counsel, and support to group members that supports the mission of the unit or organization. For example, when faced with family members’ frustration and worry about deployments, your knowledge about the unit’s mission may enable you to more effectively relieve some of their angst.

Question:
How does the environment we are in affect the members of an organization?

Answer:
Many factors about the environment can affect the members of an organization, and much of the impact depends on the purpose of the group and the diversity of the group members. For example, if it is a Family Readiness Group in Korea, chances are that some of the members may be Korean. In order to be more sensitive to the Korean group members, it might be nice to arrange some activities that incorporate the Korean culture. This would help to make the Korean members feel more included and expose non-Korean members to their host nation’s culture and traditions. when possible, adapting the environment to compliment the audience can be an effective way to increase both the comfort level of group members as well as their participation.

Question:
Should a leader do anything about the different subcultures/subgroups that often form in a large, complex organization?

Answer:
Because of diversity in large organizations, it is quite natural that subcultures/subgroups form. However, the organization's leader should try to utilize the strengths of each subculture/subgroup to ensure that they compliment and support the organization's values.

Question:
What is meant by "Command Structure?"

Answer:
Command Structure is the organizational structure for a military unit or activity that identifies the make-up of the unit or activity and who reports to whom.

Question:
What role does an advisor to a volunteer organization play?

Answer:
An advisor’s role is to give moral support to the organization and its leaders. Typically, individuals are asked to be an advisor because of their experience or because they are in a position to obtain information or assistance for the organization. Many times, advisors serve as mentors to the group’s leaders. They may have even held some of the leadership positions others now hold and can offer advice and guidance to them. An advisor should show an interest in the activities of the group and attend meetings whenever possible. He/she should be familiar with all the laws and/or regulations that apply to the organization. An advisor’s role is to ‘advise’ – not to lead, but to listen; to share experiences that will help the group grow; to serve as a positive role model; and most importantly, to encourage independent thinking and new ideas. Advisors should avoid showing favoritism to group members; acknowledging and encouraging the contributions and talents of all group members. They should praise successful efforts and make members feel their contributions count. Note also that advisors have a public role of respect and trust. They should use this role to advance the goals of the group – never for personal advantage.

Question:
Why is it important for strategic leaders to develop formal and informal alliances with other organizations?

Answer:
Strategic leaders often develop formal and informal alliances with other organizations with which they have shared objectives. This is particularly beneficial for nonprofit and government agencies. Quite often, these alliances thrive because they can share resources, information, and the talents of their people.

Question:
Why is it so important to go through the chain of command when dealing with issues or problems as opposed to going right to the top leader of the organization?

Answer:
Organizational hierarchies are established to provide an official framework for all the different activities and/or components in an organization. Each unit in the hierarchy has different responsibilities and missions, and accountability is maintained by the reporting done from level-to-level up through the chain of command. It is important to follow the appropriate chain of command when trying to resolve a problem because it helps to maintain this accountability and the problem may be resolved quicker. Skipping levels in the chain of command can cause resentment among individuals in the leadership hierarchy. It may also delay resolution of the problem because the resources needed to resolve it may be controlled by individuals lower in the hierarchy. If further assistance is needed, the issue will be taken forward to the next higher decision-maker in the chain of command.
Viewing 1-10 of 10 Knowledge Entries

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