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Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
Are strategic leaders more concerned with long-term issues?

Answer:
Although strategic leaders may focus more on long-term issues and goals that support the organization’s vision, they also need to be concerned with short-term issues. Many short-term issues need to be resolved in order for an organization to reach its long-term goals. It is a strategic leader’s responsibility to recognize this and balance organizational priorities.

Question:
As the incoming Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader, what are some tips to make the transition go smooth?

Answer:
One of the most productive things you can do is to communicate in advance with the outgoing Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader to obtain transition information (e.g., unit rosters, Appropriated funds, After Action Reports from events, etc.). The outgoing FRG leader can also brief you about community issues and give you a status report about the FRG such as ongoing issues, upcoming events they have planned, etc. The other thing you can do to make a smooth transition is to meet with the unit commander to discuss ideas and goals. Introduce yourself to community leaders with whom you may be working and also make a point to meet current FRG chairpersons. When you have your first FRG meeting, keep the agenda simple. Include introductions and perhaps take a survey of the members to see what their interests are. Learn more about leading an FRG from the Army Family Readiness Group Leader’s Handbook as well as from the other resources provided.

Question:
How do leaders of organizations balance their varied and often numerous tasks?

Answer:
Effective leaders manage their time efficiently, delegate tasks to others where appropriate, and prioritize their tasks. They may often be required to move quickly from one task or problem to another, balancing conflicting priorities while maintaining focus on the organization's long term goals. Learn more about effective leadership through the references listed here.

Question:
How do strategic leaders collaborate with other organizations with which they have an alliance?

Answer:
There are a number of things strategic leaders do to collaborate with other organizations with which they have an alliance. One of the most important things they do is develop an effective means to communicate with their partners. In order for organizations to benefit from such alliances, it is important for them to share information related to their common goals. Strategic leaders seek and share information that may influence planning and decision making when synchronizing the interest of multiple organizations. They often have to negotiate decisions that affect multiple organizations and develop courses of action to meet mutual goals. One of the key focuses of organizational alliances is to grow individually through their combined strengths. This requires communication and solidarity.

Question:
What are some techniques that strategic leaders use to foster group cooperation?

Answer:
There are a number of techniques that strategic leaders use to foster group cooperation. One way is to develop mutually agreed upon goals, methods for accomplishing tasks, and the milestones used to measure success on projects. Reaching this kind of consensus help to foster group cooperation. Developing good communication channels among group members and using effective teambuilding activities also improve group cohesion and cooperation. Sometimes just because of the position they hold, strategic leaders have the ability to influence others to commit to teamwork, cooperation and collaboration and they use this influence to encourage support for the organization. Furthermore, strategic leaders can attract commitment from group members by demonstrating an “example of excellence,” modeling the behavior and standards of excellence that they want the group to strive to achieve.
Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries

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