Skip Navigation
Tue Oct 21, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Listing

Select a Question & Answer entry to see a list of service providers.

Using Technology -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-7 of 7 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
Are a leader's technical competencies, or hard skills, more or less important than his/her leadership and interpersonal, or soft skills?

Answer:
Effective leaders should have both strong leadership skills and the appropriate technical skills to support the position he/she holds. Leading people takes more than charisma, good interpersonal skills, and effective organizational management abilities. These qualities are extremely important, but a leader should also possess some technical knowledge about the work his/her subordinates perform. Technical competency enhances a leaders ability to lead.

Question:
How can I get my staff to embrace different communication tools such as email instead of telephone calls and video teleconferencing instead of on-site meetings?

Answer:
Introducing change of any kind in an organization can often be met with skepticism and other difficulties, but it’s very important for most business to keep up with technological advances. One suggestion for gaining more support from your staff members is to include them in the change process. It might help to appoint members of your staff to do the research on some of the new tools you would like to implement. Encourage them to use and improve their technical skills by providing training and demonstrating to them how these skills and new tools can benefit them as well as increase efficiency in the organization. Learn more about adapting to change and/or communication skills from the references provided.

Question:
How does technological resources impact an organization's effectiveness?

Answer:
The amount and type of technological resources an organization has really depends on the organization’s business operation. For example, cell phones are essential to some professions such as sales, investment firms, doctors, real estate agents, etc. Many organizations in the sales industry used to rely solely on physical sales generated from stores whereas Internet sales now may be a large part of their income. Also, some businesses may need to modernize their equipment in order to remain competitive. It is important for an organization to identify and obtain the use of needed technology assets as their future could depend on it.

Question:
How important is it for a leader to be computer literate?

Answer:
So much of an organization's information is stored on computers these days, and businesses are really dependent on them. Therefore, it is wise for leaders to have at least some knowledge about computers even if it is just to know what they are capable of doing. For example, word processing software is used for correspondence, reports, newsletters, etc. Spreadsheet software programs are used to store financial information and databases are used for things like inventories, contacts, etc. Other software programs are used to create briefings and drawings, web pages, and professional publications.

Question:
Is email communication an effective method to distribute information to Family Readiness Group (FRG) members?

Answer:
Email communication is a very effective and efficient method to distribute information (disseminating newsletters, sending updates to meetings, etc.) to Family Readiness Group (FRG) members. However, it is important to recognize its limitations. For example, some members may not have easy access to a computer or the Internet. Electronic communication is impersonal, so messages sent via email may not have the same effect as a personal phone call or visit. Additionally, there are privacy and security concerns to be aware of when sending messages via email. While email is a very effective method to communicate with FRG members, keep these limitations in mind and supplement when necessary with alternate, or perhaps more personal, methods of contact.

Question:
What kind of communication methods should I use to stay in contact with Family Readiness Group (FRG) members?

Answer:
Good communication is one of the most important ingredients of an effective Family Readiness Group (FRG). As an FRG leader, committee chairperson, or Phone Tree Point of Contact person, you will find yourself using several different communication methods. Phone calls and personal visits may be the most effective way to greet newcomers whereas sending news updates might be more effectively handled through email distributions. Communicating information at meetings allows for members to interact and ask questions. Many FRGs create their own websites to display general information about the group, unit, and/or to display photos from their events. Mailing flyers or official newsletters is another effective means for communicating with your FRG. Consult the Army Family Readiness Group Leader’s Handbook for more information on how to communicate with FRG members as well as to learn rules and regulations that apply (such as the Privacy Act; security issues in terms of what kind of information can be included in your newsletter or on a website, etc.).

Question:
Where can I learn how to create, send, read and respond to email?

Answer:
Many communication software programs include tutorials or “Help” files that provide instructions on how to send and receive email. However, you can also learn out to communicate via email through basic computer courses that are often available through the Army Continuing Education Center, Army Community Service Center, local adult education centers, private and community colleges, etc. Family Readiness Groups often sponsor classes on how to use the computer for email communication. Check with local resources, or the references listed here, for more information.
Viewing 1-7 of 7 Knowledge Entries

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: