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Parenting -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
What are some tips for effective parenting?

Answer:
Parenting is probably one of the toughest jobs in the world, but it can also be the most rewarding. There are no magic formulas to make someone an effective parent, but there are a lot of resources (books, videos, websites, parenting classes, etc.) that offer information on raising children. Most researchers on this subject agree that nurturing your child’s self-esteem is important to your child’s ability to become confident, independent individuals. It is also important to build structure in a child’s life. Children need to know what their limits are and what the consequences are if they step over those boundaries. It is important for parents to be consistent with their method of discipline so children know without a doubt what the consequences will be for certain actions. Loving your child unconditionally is also important because it reassures your child that even if they make mistakes in life, or do things that disappoint you, you will be there for them. Another good tip for effective parenting is to set a good example for your child. Children learn much of their behavior from their environment so it is important to be a good role model for your child. Note that these tips are not conclusive, but offer just a few suggestions for effective parenting. Consult your health provider for additional information and resources; visit the library or bookstore for reading materials and videos on parenting; or consider taking effective parenting classes. The Family Advocacy Program office often offers free parenting classes, as do many Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs).

Question:
What can I do to prepare my child for my spouse's deployment?

Answer:
Deployments can be very difficult on families, particularly on children. Depending on the age of a child, it is important for the child to have some understanding of what a deployment is why his/her parent must go away. It is also important for the child to maintain some form of normalcy in his/her daily routine as well as to maintain contact with his/her parent during the time the parent is deployed whether it be via the phone, Internet or mail. Some parents record audio and/or videotapes of themselves reading bedtime stories before they deploy so the young child can hear his/her parent's voice while they are separated. Your Family Readiness Group (FRG) Leader may have other suggestions, as might your military community's Deployment Readiness Coordinator. There are also many deployment resources available online to assist you with activities and advice for helping children cope before, during and after a parent's deployment.

Question:
What do I need to do in order to use the Child and Youth Services facilities on post?

Answer:
In order to use the Child and Youth Services programs in your military community, you must complete a registration process that may vary according to the type of programs you want your child to participate in. For example, to use the Child Development Services (CDS) for childcare, you will have to complete several standard registration forms that provide CDS management and care giving staff with child and family data needed for program management, health, safety, enrollment and admission requirements. The registration packet also includes several consent forms that outline the types of activities the child can participate in, any medication that may need dispensing while your child is at the CDS facility, emergency contact information, a family care plan (if applicable), and health assessment forms (including proof that your child’s immunizations are current). U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Child and Adult Care Food Program (USDA CACFP) enrollment forms is used to determine patron eligibility categories and reimbursement levels for program participation is also included. The packet will also include a Sponsor/Program Agreement that outlines and clarifies the responsibilities of the parent or guardian and the CDS program regarding provision and acceptance of CDS services. While this list is not all-inclusive, it provides a summary of the key areas that are covered in the CDS Registration Packet. Note that you will need to update your child’s registration annually and that a registration fee normally applies.

Question:
What is the New Parent Support Program (NPSP)?

Answer:
The New Parent Support Program (NPSP) is a prevention-oriented program offered through Army Community Service (ACS). There are two levels of the program offered. The first is NPSP - Standard that, in general, offers general parenting classes and information and is open to all eligible constituents. The NPSP - Plus program is considered a secondary prevention program. The focus for the Plus program is on new parents who are considered high-risk families. Home visits are the primary service offered by the Plus program. The purpose is to teach parents the skills they need to cope as new parents and manage all the stresses that accompany that new role to eliminate the potential for child abuse.

Question:
Where can my teenager obtain babysitter training/classes?

Answer:
The American Red Cross offers Babysitter's Training courses that are often made available through the Child and Youth Services Programs in military communities. You may also find similar courses through your child's schools or local Boys and Girls Clubs.
Viewing 1-5 of 5 Knowledge Entries

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