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Deployment Communications -- Question & Answer Listing  
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Question / Answer

Question:
What kind of meetings should I schedule for our Family Readiness Group?

Answer:
Family Readiness Group (FRG) meetings can be pure social or informational. You can also make them working meetings if you need volunteers to help with a group project – such as making welcome home signs for redeployments. Meetings should have a purpose – even if it is just a group picnic or holiday party. It is always a good idea, however, to have some kind of agenda and to start and end meetings promptly. The Army Family Readiness Group Leader's Handbook is an excellent resource for ideas and information about conducting FRG meetings. The Army Family Team Building program has a Level II course on Meeting Management that also provides some very helpful information on how to conduct meetings. Learn more from these resources and other references listed here.

Question:
What kind of services does the American Red Cross offer?

Answer:
The American Red Cross provides various services in emergency situations such as disaster relief, health and safety services, blood services, volunteer opportunities, first aid classes, communication services following the death or serious illness of a family member, the birth of a child or in other family emergencies, etc.

Question:
What restrictions are there for mail sent to my deployed Soldier?

Answer:
There are several things you should be aware of when sending mail to your deployed Soldier. For example, recognize that it may take longer than usual to reach your Soldier depending on his/her location, there may be customs restrictions on the size and type of items sent, and it is very important that you have the correct identifying information included in the address. For more information, contact the unit's Rear Detachment Commander (RDC), a point of contact (POC) at the Family Assistance Center (FAC), or your Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader who can advise you on mailing procedures.

Question:
What security measures should I take to protect myself while my spouse is deployed?

Answer:
Safeguarding yourself and your home should be something you do regularly, whether your spouse is deployed or not. However, there are several things you can do to protect yourself when your spouse is deployed such as letting your neighbors know you are alone so they can be aware of anything out of the ordinary at your home and by being more observant of your surroundings. If you go out of town during the deployment, make sure you stop/suspend any newspaper and mail delivery or have a neighbor collect these items so they do not accumulate and "advertise" that no one is home. If you live in government quarters, it is wise to let your local military police (MP) know that you will be out of town. They will often drive by and check on your house while you are away. For more security tips, check with your military police or local law enforcement officials.
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