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Rear Detachments -- Question & Answer Listing  
Viewing 1-6 of 6 Knowledge Entries
Question / Answer

Question:
How can our Family Readiness Group plan welcome home receptions when the unit's return dates and times keep changing?

Answer:
Acknowledge the fact that unit return dates and times will vary and often change at the last minute. If the unit is returning from an overseas deployment such as Iraq or Afghanistan (or any place where there is conflict or internal turmoil), flight schedules and rosters typically remain classified – for security reasons – until the flights actually take off. This is for your Soldier’s protection. Additionally, changes in weather or other factors can cause delays. Accept these facts and try to be flexible with your welcome home reception plans. Family Readiness Group (FRG) leaders should stay in close contact with the Rear Detachment Commander, as he/she should be able to provide the most current information on incoming personnel. Maintain current phone trees to enable you to pass on updates and coordinate your welcome home receptions. Keep in mind that when a large unit deploys, they often return in shifts and some returning groups may be smaller than others. Try to extend the same enthusiasm and warm welcome home reception to each group of Soldiers, regardless of their size.

Question:
If my sponsor is deployed and I plan on visiting my family while he/she is away, should Iet anyone at my sponsor's unit know about my travel plans?

Answer:
Family members should notify the Rear Detachment Commander, the Family Readiness Group (FRG) representative and/or emergency contact person of any travel plans and a contact number in case of an emergency.

Question:
What are the primary responsibilities of the Rear Detachment Commander when a unit is deployed?

Answer:
When a unit is deployed, a Rear Detachment Commander is designated to coordinate activities of the unit and facilitate communication with the unit and its members while deployed. They also serve as a key point of contact for the Family Readiness Group.

Question:
What is the purpose of a unit's rear detachment operations?

Answer:
The Rear Detachment Officer (RDO) is the unit officer who acts as the unit commander in the rear when the unit is deployed. The RDO is responsible for all Soldiers and property in the rear, unit and installation support missions, the training of replacements, and supporting the needs of the unit’s family members. The RDO maintains regular contact with the deployed unit and serves as the main point of contact for the unit’s Family Readiness Group (FGR) Leaders. The RDO maintains a small staff to assist him/her with rear detachment operations and often times, they are relocated to the Family Readiness Center to more easily support family members.

Question:
What restrictions are there for mail sent to my deployed Soldier?

Answer:
There are several things you should be aware of when sending mail to your deployed Soldier. For example, recognize that it may take longer than usual to reach your Soldier depending on his/her location, there may be customs restrictions on the size and type of items sent, and it is very important that you have the correct identifying information included in the address. For more information, contact the unit's Rear Detachment Commander (RDC), a point of contact (POC) at the Family Assistance Center (FAC), or your Family Readiness Group (FRG) leader who can advise you on mailing procedures.

Question:
What should I do if someone from the media questions me about my spouse's unit's deployment?

Answer:
You have the right to speak to the media if you choose to. However, if questions arise about your spouse’s unit and/or any deployments associated with the unit, keep in mind “Operation Security” otherwise referred to as “OPSEC.” According to the Interagency OPSEC Support Staff website at http://www.ioss.gov, “Operations Security (OPSEC) is an analytic process used to deny an adversary information - generally unclassified - concerning our intentions and capabilities by identifying, controlling, and protecting indicators associated with our planning processes or operations. OPSEC does not replace other security disciplines - it supplements them.” In other words, chose your words carefully when it comes to information about the unit's activities. It is best to refer the media to the appropriate authorities (Rear Detachment Commander, the Public Affairs Office, etc.) for questions regarding unit activities. Even if the information you give out does not appear sensitive, you don't want to jeopardize the safety of the unit's Soldiers or their family members. If you do talk to the media, be friendly, honest, and professional. Make sure you understand the questions being asked and stick to the facts when answering them. If you cannot answer a question, do not feel embarrassed to say, “I don’t know” or “I’d rather not answer that question.” Keep the interview centered on topics you are comfortable with, your own experiences and knowledge. You have the right to stop the interview at any point. Remember also, that when speaking about the military – you represent the military. If you ever have any questions or concerns about talking to reporters, contact your local Public Affairs Office for assistance. The Army Family Team Building program offers a class on how to speak to the media. Contact your local office for more information on their schedule of classes.
Viewing 1-6 of 6 Knowledge Entries

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