Skip Navigation
Thu Aug 21, 2014
 
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Army OneSource
Commander's Page Online Training
Volunteer Tools ARMYBook
My AOS Page Services Locator

Question & Answer Service Providers

Click on a Service Provider or Reference below for more information.

Having a Family Readiness Group (FRG) plan for dealing with trauma in the unit may be a smart thing to do, but wouldn’t it stir up unnecessary anxieties?  
No one wants to face the fact that a unit could experience injuries or casualties during a deployment, but being prepared for such a crisis is very important. A crisis is tragic enough, but when chaos follows, the situation is worsened. It is important to develop a plan for dealing with trauma in the organization so that Family Readiness Group (FRG) members know what to do to support each other and those affected by the tragedy better. The way to approach any kind of trauma in the unit training is to promote it as preparing the FRG for the worst-case scenario. The same training can help the FRG deal with other crises – such as the death of a family member outside the unit or perhaps an injury or illness affecting a Soldier’s family in the unit. The basis for a plan includes things like having a list of volunteers who might be willing to prepare meals for the affected family or who may be able to provide child care on short notice. Perhaps you have members who might be willing to provide transportation to and from the airport for visiting relatives. It is also a good idea to know what community resources are available to you (e.g., chaplain, Army Emergency Relief, American Red Cross, etc.). Families should be aware of the casualty notification process and have an idea of what happens to the Soldier and family following notification. There are official procedures in place for handling a casualty in the unit that involve the chain of command, the chaplain, and the Casualty Assistance Office. Although the commander may ask for the FRG leader to coordinate a meeting to inform the other spouses of the tragedy, the FRG’s support would be in the form of assistance to each other. Gestures and assistance to the grieving family as noted above may be provided, but should only be done with the grieving family’s consent and at their request. It is also important for families to know whom to contact (and who their extended families should contact) in the event of an emergency in order for the deployed Soldier to be notified. The American Red Cross provides emergency communication services to notify military personnel of a death or serious illness of a family member or other important events such as the birth of a child. In order to facilitate the notification, you should have complete identification information for your Soldier prior to contacting the Red Cross such as his/her full name, rank/rating, branch of service, social security number, unit address, and any other information about the deployed unit (e.g., attached to another organization). Your rear detachment commander can provide assistance.
Keywords: tragedy in the unit, Leadership, Crisis

Question & Answer Service Providers  
Service ProviderReferenceMeans of Delivery
American Red Cross Crisis Management Training
Army Community Service Operation R.E.A.D.Y. Handbook Publication
Army Community Service The Army Family Readiness Group Leader's Handbook Publication
Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program Crisis Intervention Programs Publication
Army Continuing Education System Problem Solving Classes Verbal
Army Continuing Education System Conflict Management Classes Verbal
Army Continuing Education System Crisis Management Training Verbal
Army Continuing Education System Crisis Intervention Programs Verbal
Army Family Team Building Army Family Team Building Level II Training Outline
Army Family Team Building Conflict Management Classes
Chaplain Crisis Intervention Programs
Chaplain Building Strong And Ready Families
Chaplain Crisis Management Training
Chaplain Conflict Management Classes
Clergy Conflict Management Classes
Clergy Crisis Management Training
Clergy Crisis Intervention Programs
Local Colleges and Universities Crisis Management Training
Local Colleges and Universities Problem Solving Classes
Local Colleges and Universities Crisis Intervention Programs
Local Colleges and Universities Conflict Management Classes
Local Schools Problem Solving Classes
Local Schools Conflict Management Classes
Mental Health Organizations Crisis Intervention Programs
Mental Health Organizations Conflict Management Classes
Mental Health Organizations Problem Solving Classes
Public and Private Training Organizations Problem Solving Classes
Public and Private Training Organizations Crisis Intervention Programs
Public and Private Training Organizations Conflict Management Classes
Public and Private Training Organizations Crisis Management Training
Public and Private Volunteer Organizations Crisis Management Training
Public and Private Volunteer Organizations Problem Solving Classes
Public and Private Volunteer Organizations Crisis Intervention Programs
Public and Private Volunteer Organizations Conflict Management Classes
U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Conflict Management Classes
U.S. Army War College Conflict Management Classes
U.S. Army War College It Takes a Team ( A Resource for the Company Commander's Spouse/ Representative)
U.S. Army War College Spouse Battle Book Publication

Full Website
This site may not be optimized
for a mobile browsing experience.
OK
Please don't show me this again: