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Army Volunteer Corps

These questions address issues for launching AVC in your area.

Category Questions  
Why did the Army establish the AVC?
What is the Army Volunteer Corps (AVC)?
Does the AVC supersede organizational identity, i.e., a Red Cross volunteer would no longer be...
Do I have to join the AVC?
Are volunteers in the National Guard and Army Reserve included in the AVC.
How is this different from the current Installation Volunteer Coordinator (IVC) program already...

Category Questions  
Why did the Army establish the AVC?
[2/5/2005]

The Survey of Army Families IV, conducted in 2002, showed that volunteerism in the Army was lower than in the civilian community. Understanding the value of volunteer service to both the individual volunteer, the Army, and to Army communities, the former Chief of Staff, Army, directed that a summit be held for the purpose of revitalizing volunteerism in the Army. Summit participants, volunteer leaders and managers in the military and civilian communities, developed an action plan that calls for formalizing the Army’s commitment to volunteers, improving support for volunteers, creating a corporate identity, and linking all volunteers to the Army - and they called it the Army Volunteer Corps.

What is the Army Volunteer Corps (AVC)?
[2/5/2005]

The AVC is a new way of thinking about volunteers and volunteering within the Army. It is an umbrella that encompasses all volunteers and organizations using volunteers. No matter where individuals volunteer in the Army community, they have the same goal. People volunteer to contribute to the Army, to Soldiers, and to their family members. The intent of the AVC is to recognize this commonality of purpose among all Army volunteers and to instill the same pride in being an Army volunteer as they now have for the organization where they provide their service. The establishment of the Army Volunteer Corps connects volunteers and demonstrates the Army's commitment to its volunteers.

Does the AVC supersede organizational identity, i.e., a Red Cross volunteer would no longer be identified as a Red Cross volunteer?
[2/5/2005]

No, the AVC does not supersede organizational identity. It gives another identity to the volunteer that demonstrates their connection to the larger community – the Army community – as an Army volunteer.

Do I have to join the AVC?
[2/5/2005]

No, there is no organization to join. You are a member of the AVC when you volunteer for any organization that provides service to soldiers and families.

Are volunteers in the National Guard and Army Reserve included in the AVC.
[2/5/2005]

Yes, The AVC links all volunteers - Active, Guard, and Reserve.

How is this different from the current Installation Volunteer Coordinator (IVC) program already available on many military installations?
[2/5/2005]

The AVC formalizes the Army’s commitment to volunteerism and gives a corporate identity to all volunteers that connects them to the Army. The IVC program will be the focal point of the AVC on installations, will be strengthened by the AVC, and will refocus to meet emerging needs. In conjunction with the inauguration of the AVC, the IVC will be renamed the AVC Coordinator.


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